Madame Vice President: Kamala Harris

LinkedIn
U.S. Vice President Kamala Harris walks the abbreviated parade route after U.S. President Joe Biden's inauguration on January 20, 2021 in Washington, DC. Biden became the 46th president of the United States earlier today during the ceremony at the U.S. Capitol.

On January 20, 2021, Kamala Harris made history by becoming the first woman Vice President of the United States, being elected with her running mate, President Joe Biden.

In addition to being the first woman to hold the office, Harris is also the first Black and Indian American person in her position.

Growing up in Oakland, Harris was raised by two immigrants. Her father, Donald Harris, was originally from Jamaica and is an economics Professor at Stanford University and her mother, Shyamala Gopalan, who immigrated from India, was a civil rights activist and a breast cancer researcher. Before passing in 2009, Gopalan raised Kamala and her sister on the words, “Don’t sit around and complain. Do something,” a motto that has guided Harris throughout her life.

(Photo by Patrick Smith/Getty Images)

In 1986, Harris earned her Bachelor’s degrees in political science and economics from Howard University, one of the most well-known HBCUs in the country. From there, Harris went on to attend University of California’s Hastings College of Law through the Legal Education Opportunity Program. She graduated with a Juris Doctor in 1989 and was admitted to the California Bar a year later. While attending both schools, Harris was heavily involved in extracurricular activities such as the economics society, the Black Law Students Association, and the debate team.

Harris life in politics began early, working as a deputy district attorney in Oakland for several years until she was elected as California’s attorney general. She was the first black woman to hold that position and oversee one of the country’s largest Justice Departments. While in office, Harris created an environmental crimes unit, promoted criminal justice reform, and helped establish legislature for equality for the diverse races and the LGBTQ communities.

Harris went on to serve in the U.S. Senate in 2017 where she worked on the Committees on Budget, Homeland Security and Governmental Affairs, Judiciary, and Intelligence. She was also a member on the Black and Asian Pacific American Congressional Caucuses, as well as the Congressional Caucus for Women’s issues. She advocated for the same issues during her time in the Senate, additionally advocating for women’s rights, immigration rights, and the passing of the Justice for the Victims of Lynching Act.

Now, in her position as Vice President, Harris’ campaign continues to bring the rights of all people to the forefront, putting COVID-19 issues, health care, climate change, systemic racism, and the economy as a priority.

Vice President Harris has shown both gratitude and hope since her election to office. On November 7, 2020, Vice President Harris spoke on her victory, “While I may be the first woman in this office, I will not be the last — because every little girl watching tonight sees that this is a country of possibilities.”

Source: Wikipedia, buildbackbetter.gov

There isn’t a Single Black Woman on House Dems’ Leadership Team. It’s Not New.

LinkedIn
Closeup image of Brenda Lawrence wearing red lipstick and pearl necklace

By Sarah Ferris and Heather Caygle for Politico

When Democratic Rep. Brenda Lawrence lost her leadership race by a single vote, she looked up the last time a Black woman was elected to sit at her party’s leadership table in the House.

She was stunned to learn it was Rep. Shirley Chisholm of New York — 44 years ago. In the same year the U.S. elected its first Black woman to serve as vice president, the House Democratic Caucus once again elected a leadership team that didn’t include a single Black woman. “When the vote is taken by our body, Black women don’t

(Image Credit – Alex Brandon/AP Photo)

win,” Lawrence (D-Mich.) said in an interview. “I cannot comprehend how, for 40 years, a Black woman has never earned the collective majority vote of our caucus.”

In a caucus that frequently touts diversity as one of its core strengths, Black women have been repeatedly excluded from elected senior positions. And despite the country as a whole undergoing a reckoning over race in recent months, the current leadership team will remain in place for the next two years. It’s an issue several Democrats told POLITICO must be rectified, although no one has a clear idea on how to do that.

“I think it’s something that absolutely needs to be addressed,” said Rep. Karen Bass (D-Calif.) who just finished a two-year term as chair of the Congressional Black Caucus. “The caucus as a whole is sensitive to it now where I don’t know that they were a couple of terms ago.”

The leadership of the House Democratic Caucus has never been more diverse: White women — Speaker Nancy Pelosi and Assistant Speaker Katherine Clark — hold two of the top four positions in the House, while House Majority Whip Jim Clyburn (D-S.C.), the highest ranking African American in Congress, has been atop the caucus for years. Another high-ranking Black Democrat, Rep. Hakeem Jeffries (D-N.Y.), is in his second term as caucus chairman and is frequently discussed as the next speaker.

Read the full article at Politico.

Keke Palmer Hosts ‘Our White House,’ Inauguration Day Program for Kids

LinkedIn
Keke Palmer wearing black upper body shot split image Capitol

By Kait Hanson for Today

U.S. Senator Kamala Harris will make history on Wednesday when she is sworn in as the first female Vice President of the United States — but that’s not the only way the Biden-Harris team is making history.

For the first time ever, a special Inauguration Day program, made especially for children, will be live-streamed from Washington, D.C.

(Image Credit – Today)

“Inaugurations are one of the most important American traditions,” soon-to-be First Lady Dr. Jill Biden said in a video posted to the Biden Inaugural Instagram account. “And this year, for the first time ever, we’re streaming a special live broadcast made for students and families across the country. Our White House: An Inaugural Celebration for Young Americans.”

“Join me and host Keke Palmer, along with lots of other special guests, as we come together to make history,” Biden said. “See you at the Capitol!”

Our White House will feature commentary from historians Doris Kearns Goodwin and Erica Armstrong Dunbar, as well as excerpts of student voices from PBS NewsHour Student Reporting Labs’ “We the Young People” programming.

While specifics of the event have not been revealed, highlights to look forward to include a Nickelodeon-produced segment on presidential pets and trivia questions from Vice President elect-Harris’ husband, Doug Emhoff.

Inauguration Day 2021 will look vastly different than in previous years. Instead of in-person spectators, a field of 200,000 flags stands in honor of the upcoming swearing in and packs the space traditionally filled with Inauguration Day crowds at the National Mall.

Dr. Biden ends the short social media clip with a jubilant smile saying, “See you at the Capitol!” It’s a feat only feasible this year thanks to technology.

Read the original post at Today.

New York Congressmen Make History as First Openly Gay Black Members

LinkedIn
Mondaire Jones and Ritchie Torres

Ritchie John Torres, New York City Councilmember for the 15th district, and Mondaire Jones, Democratic nominee for New York’s 17th congressional district, are the first openly gay Black men elected to Congress.

A member of the Democratic Party elected in 2013, Torres is also the first openly gay candidate to be elected to legislative office in the Bronx, and the youngest member of the city council. He serves as the chair of the Committee on Public Housing, and is a deputy majority leader. As chair of the Oversight and Investigations Committee, he is focusing on taxi medallion predatory loans, and the city’s Third-Party

Image Credit: Ritchie John Torres – Official NYC Council Photo
by William Alatriste; Mondaire Jones – Photo by Caroline
Brehman/CQ-Roll Call, Inc via Getty Images.

Transfer Program. In 2016, Torres was a delegate for the Bernie Sanders campaign.

In July 2019, Torres announced his bid for New York’s 15th congressional district, to succeed Representative José E. Serrano. The 15th district is one of the most Democratic leaning congressional districts in the country. Torres won the November 2020 general election, and will assume office on January 3, 2021.
Mondaire Jones, an American attorney and politician from the state of New York, won as the Democratic nominee for New York’s 17th congressional district in the 2020 election. Jones announced his candidacy for the Democratic primary to represent New York’s 17th congressional district in the 2020 elections against incumbent Representative Nita Lowey, who later announced that she would not seek re-election.

Jones advocated for Medicare for All, the Green New Deal, and police reform. In honor of the 50th anniversary of the first LGBTQ Pride parade in June, Queerty named Jones among the 50 heroes “leading the nation toward equality, acceptance, and dignity for all people.”

Source: Wikipedia

Living History: Kamala Harris’ pioneering path to the White House

LinkedIn
Kamala Harris on stage white suit wearing a mask

By Jovane Marie

History was made and made again during the 2020 election. From the most votes cast in a presidential election in U.S. history to a wave of new, young, novice, minority, and LGBTQIA+ representatives in Congress, the litany of firsts made an immediate impact, widening representation among our elected leaders and laying out a new landscape of inclusion and diversity.

It was the election of Kamala Devi Harris, however, to the second-highest office in the country –

making her the highest-ranking woman in the history of American politics – that tipped the scale and underscored its historic relevance. 

Though undeniably her highest accomplishment, Harris’ newest title, Madam Vice President, is just the latest in an enduring, ceiling-shattering career of firsts.

This trailblazer is no stranger to making history.

Paving the Way

Long before her ascension to the vice-presidency, Harris’ resume of firsts had ensured her place in the history books several times over.

First African-American, first South Asian-American, and first woman elected district attorney of San Francisco. First African-American, first South Asian-American, and first woman attorney general of California. First Indian-American woman and second Black woman elected to the U.S. Senate. 

Focused, determined, and passionate, her accomplishments can be traced back in part to her upbringing, her education, and a piece of life-shaping advice offered by her mother: “Don’t sit around and complain about things, Kamala. Do something.”

Armed with Education

Kamala Harris on stage pink blazer
California Senator and Democratic vice presidential nominee Kamala Harris arrives to speak at a drive-in campaign rally in Phoenix, Arizona on October 28, 2020. (Photo by ARIANA DREHSLER / AFP) (Photo by ARIANA DREHSLER/AFP via Getty Images)

Harris’ monumental career is rooted in an educational foundation that provided a unique perspective and experience to her journey. As the daughter of academically inclined parents – both earned doctorates in their respective fields – the expectation was to excel.

She earned a degree in political science and economics from the illustrious Howard University (chosen largely due to the fact that her hero, trailblazing lawyer and Supreme Court Justice Thurgood Marshall, also attended). Immersed in and influenced by the unmatched cultural atmosphere offered by a historically Black college, she credits the experience as formative to her personal evolution.

“I became an adult there,” the former senator shared in a Washington Post interview. “Howard very directly influenced and reinforced – equally important – my sense of being and meaning and reasons for being.”

Surrounded by a common-place sense of political awareness and activism, Harris’ credence in the value of racial representation in government and corporate institutions was stoked during her tenure, alongside a keen sense of argumentation and an overarching belief that the best way to change a system is from the inside out. Internships with Senator Alan Cranston of California and the Federal Trade Commission, as well as jobs at the National Archives and the U.S. Bureau of Engraving and Printing, provided a pathway to do so.

Kamala Harris with leaders of HBCU
WASHINGTON, DC – FEBRUARY 07: Democratic presidential candidate Sen. Kamala Harris (D-CA) (C) poses for a group photo with leaders from historically black colleges and universities (Photo by Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images)

By the time she graduated in 1986, she had made her mark: chairing the economics society, leading the debate team, participating in campus activism, and joining Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority, Inc. (the first African-American Greek-lettered sorority). 

Her postgraduate journey led her to the University of California Hastings College of Law, where she attended as part of the Legal Education Opportunity Program and served as president of the Black Law Students Association before graduating in 1989 and being admitted to the California Bar the next year.

If Harris’ varied collegiate experience was the catalyst for her career of service, then her family was the incubator. Years before she ever pursued higher education, she was surrounded and influenced by a familial tradition of public service. 

“Growing up, there was no question in my family that you must serve,” she said during a lecture at Spelman University in 2018. “There was simply no question.”

Her maternal grandfather, P.V. Gopalan, was a high-ranking government official who fought for Indian independence; her grandmother, Rajam, was an activist who traveled the countryside teaching impoverished women about birth control.

In fact, her decision to enter the legal field was influenced heavily by her grandfather, who she frequently overheard discussing politics, corruption, and justice while visiting India during her childhood. 

“The lessons I learned from my grandfather are a big reason I do what I do today,” she said during an event supporting India’s Independence Day. “Lawyers have a profound ability to be a voice for the vulnerable and the voiceless, and that’s what I wanted to be.”

Raised to Make a Difference

Kamala Harris and Joe Biden book stand
PHILADELPHIA, PA – NOVEMBER 10: A display of books about President-elect Joe Biden and Vice President-elect Kamala Harris (Photo by Mark Makela/Getty Images)

To understand the trajectory of Harris’ life and her journey to the White House, you have to understand where she comes from. The daughter of two immigrants, her upbringing centered and solidified her identity and desire to be engaged and aware of the politics, organizations, and struggles of the Black community – and beyond.

Her father, Donald Harris, an emeritus professor of economics at Stanford, was born in Jamaica’s St. Ann’s Parish and came to the University of California at Berkeley in the early 60s on a scholarship from the British colonial government. Drawn to the civil rights movement, he joined the school’s Afro American Association, a building block of the Black Power movement that would help build the discipline of Black studies, introduce the holiday of Kwanzaa, and establish the Black Panther Party. An astute academic, he viewed the US as a “lively and evolving dynamic of a racially and ethnically complex society,” and was the first Black scholar to receive tenure in Stanford’s economics department. 

It was her mother, Shyamala Gopalan, a renowned breast cancer research scientist, however, whom Harris credits with being most responsible for shaping her into the woman she has become. 

Kamala HArris and Joe Biden on stage with their team
WILMINGTON, DELAWARE – NOVEMBER 07: President-elect Joe Biden and Vice President-elect Kamala Harris, stand with their spouses, Dr. Jill Biden and Douglas Emhoff. (Photo by Andrew Harnik-Pool/Getty Images)

“I’m the daughter of a mother who broke down all kinds of barriers,” she shared last Mother’s Day. “Shyamala was no more than five feet tall, but if you ever met her, you’d think she was seven feet. She had such spirit and tenacity, and I’m thankful every day to have been raised by her.”

The oldest child in a high-achieving Brahmin family from Tamil Nadu, India, Gopalan relocated to the states in 1960 to pursue a doctorate in endocrinology at UC Berkeley, receiving her PhD the same year Harris was born. She, too, was drawn to the energy of the civil rights movement, and as a former colonial subject and person of color, found herself wholly accepted into the Afro American Association. 

It was against this backdrop of activism and change that she and Donald met, married, and began expanding their family (with Kamala in 1964, followed by sister Maya in 1967).

Harris fondly recalls her early grounding in the movement for equality: the energetic waves of bodies and voices as she attended protests with her parents; hearing Shirley Chisholm, the first Black woman to mount a national campaign for president, speak in 1971; and being part of the second class to integrate her elementary school.

“My parents would bring me to protests strapped in my stroller, and my mother raised my sister and me to believe that it was up to us and every generation of Americans to keep on marching,” she divulged during her first campaign appearance as the Democratic vice-presidential nominee. 

Supporters with signs for Harris and Biden
SAN FRANCISCO, CA – NOV. 7: Tyler Scarlet (center) and Graciela Ruiz (holding the “Congrats Kamala” sign) outside City Hall celebrate the victory of President-elect Joe Biden and Vice President-elect Kamala Harris, Saturday. (Santiago Mejia/The San Francisco Chronicle via Getty Images)

“It’s because of them and the folks who also took to the streets to fight for justice that I am where I am. They laid the path for me.”

When the couple divorced in 1971 (Harris was seven), Gopalan settled in Oakland, California, and took on the sole role of raising her daughters, simultaneously balancing a growing research career, protesting and advocating for civil rights, and bringing up her biracial children with an understanding and appreciation of both of their cultural identities – especially their Blackness.

“My mother understood very well that she was raising two Black daughters,” Harris wrote in her 2019 autobiography, The Truths We Hold. “She knew that her adopted homeland would see Maya and me as Black girls, and she was determined to make sure we would grow into confident, proud Black women.”

To that end, Gopalan herself adopted African-American culture, ensuring her daughters attended a Black Baptist church with neighbors and a preschool with prominent photos of Frederick Douglass and Harriet Tubman, as well as surrounding them with the supplemental love, guidance, and support of her fellow Afro American Association members.

The culmination of this conscious and nurturing upbringing resulted in Harris’ fully realized and unapologetic acceptance of her multicultural identity. In her words, both her Black and Indian heritages are of equal weight in terms of who she is. 

“The point is: I am who I am. I’m good with it,” she told the Washington Post while on the campaign trail. “You might need to figure it out, but I’m fine with it.”

For the People

The impact of Harris’ appointment to the second-highest office in the nation is – much like the former senator herself – multifaceted. Americans who have never seen themselves represented in the country’s absolute highest echelons now have the chance.

Kamala Harris with a girl in a red dress
WASHINGTON, DC – MAY 23: U.S. Sen. Kamala Harris (D-CA) (L) plays with 18-month-old Hawa Tembe (R), whose mother is an immigrant from Mozambique, during a news conference on immigration (Photo by Alex Wong/Getty Images)

It is a responsibility she does not take lightly. Time and again, Harris has proven through her words and actions that she is acutely aware of her ability to engage with and appeal to many American identities, and committed to her duty of ensuring they are seen and heard.

She is a source of pride for the children of immigrants and the Black, Indian, and South Asian communities, expanding the beliefs and perceived potential of how high they can ascend and how much they can influence the American story.

She embodies the fighting spirit of women and girls of all races, backgrounds, creeds and political affiliations, encouraging them to speak up as they make their ways through life.

“What I want women and girls to know is this: You are powerful and your voice matters,” she told Marie Claire. “You’re going to walk into many rooms in your life and career where you may be the only one who looks like you or has had the experiences you’ve had. But you remember that when you are in those rooms, you are not alone.

We are all in that room with you, applauding you on. Cheering your voice. So you use that voice and be strong.”

She personifies the grit and legacy of Black women like Shirley Chisholm and Carol Moseley, and is reflected in the millions of little girls of color who see their faces in her, challenging them to stand firm in their identities and what they bring to the table.

“There will be people who say to you, ‘You are out of your lane,’” she told participants of the 2020 Black Girls Lead conference. “They are burdened by only having the capacity to see what has always been instead of what can be. But don’t you let that burden you.

Kamala Harris and her husband
WASHINGTON, DC – NOVEMBER 28: U.S. Vice President-elect Kamala Harris and her husband Doug Emhoff. (Photo by Tasos Katopodis/Getty Images)

Don’t be burdened by their perspectives or judgement, and do not let anyone ever tell you who you are. You tell them who you are.”

She, along with her husband, Doug, and step-children Cole and Ella (who lovingly call her Momala), are a shining example of the beauty of family – no matter how they are constructed. All you need, she posits, is love. 

“The thing about blended families is this – if everyone approaches it in the way that there’s plenty of love to share, then it works,” she said about her modern-day brood. “And we have plenty of love to share within our extended family.”

And, perhaps most importantly, she is an enduring reminder that while breaking barriers may be painful, the fight is worth it to ensure that the next generation will have a path. It is the immortal lesson given to her by the most important role model of her life: her mother.

“My mother would look at me and she’d say, ‘Kamala, you may be the first to do many things, but make sure you’re not the last,’” she recalls often. “That’s why breaking those barriers are worth it. As much as anything else, it is also to create that path for those who will come after us.”

Guided by this life motto, Vice President Harris knows one thing for sure – she may be the first woman to hold the office, but she won’t be the last.

Black Georgia voters’ High Turnout Helped Solidify a Historic Win, Organizers Say

LinkedIn
Jeezy wearing a blue suit with a skyline in the background

Black Georgia voters showed up in droves for the state’s pair of US Senate runoffs and voting rights groups say the high turnout plus aggressive organizing efforts helped solidify a historic win.

Rev. Raphael Warnock, the senior pastor of the historic Ebenezer Baptist Church in Atlanta, was elected on Tuesday to be the first Black senator from Georgia, CNN projected early Wednesday morning. The control of the US Senate now comes down to Republican David Perdue, who is running to keep his seat against Democrat Jon Ossoff.
(Jeezy, hip-hop artists, CNN.) 

Black-led voting groups spent the last six weeks knocking on millions of doors, registering voters, distributing mailers, hosting events and partnering with Atlanta hip-hop artists to expand their reach. Their efforts came as Atlanta was thrust into the national spotlight following Biden’s victory that flipped Georgia blue nafter he won the state by more than 11,000 votes. In the days leading up to the Senate runoffs, Black women such as Stacey Abrams and LaTosha Brown once again emerged as the leading voices, appearing on social media, national television and bus tours to urge Black people to vote.

Read the full article at CNN.

Meet Kamala Harris’ Unapologetically Black Senior Staff

LinkedIn

Tina Flournoy, Symone Sanders and Ashley Etienne join a steadily browning and diverse Biden administration.

Vice President-elect Kamala Harris‘ senior staff is shaping up to be a proper representation of the voters who are largely credited for her and Joe Biden‘s historic election. Not only are the top three staffers Black but they are also women, a combinatory nod to the group often called the backbone of the Democratic Party.

(Image credit – News One)

The last addition to Harris’ staff is Tina Flournoy, who was formally picked on Tuesday to be the vice president’s chief of staff. The transition for Flournoy shouldn’t be too difficult since that’s the same role she’s been working in for former President Bill Clinton. Flournoy has also had stints as a senior adviser to Democratic National Convention Chairman Howard Dean and as an Assistant to the President for Public Policy at the American Federation of Teachers.

Her bio on the website for Georgetown University — where she graduated from law school – detailed her extensive experience working on behalf of Democrats in positions that include: “traveling chief of staff to 2000 Democratic vice presidential nominee, Senator Joseph Lieberman, Finance Director for the Gore 2000 Presidential Campaign and Deputy to the Campaign Manager in the 1992 Clinton/Gore Presidential Transition Office and in the White House Office of Presidential Personnel. Flournoy also served as General Counsel for the 1992 Democratic National Convention. Prior to joining the Convention team, Flournoy was Counsel for the DNC under Chairmen Paul Kirk and Ron Brown.”

Read the full article at News One.

Kamala Harris speaks for the first time as vice president-elect

LinkedIn
Kamala Harrsie stands behind podium smiling with U.S. flags in the background

Kamala Harris addressed Americans for the first time as vice president-elect of the United States, making history as the first woman, Black American and South Asian American to win the nation’s second highest office.

At an event in Wilmington, Delaware, with President-elect Joe Biden, she nodded specifically to the work of the women who came before her, adding: “While I may be the first woman in this office, I will not be the last.”

She spoke about an America under the Biden administration that focused on equality and justice, and reminded supporters that “America’s democracy is not guaranteed — it is only as strong as our willingness to fight for it.”

The Associated Press called the 2020 election for Biden after calling the race in Pennsylvania, giving him more than the 270 electoral votes needed to capture the presidency. “We the people have the power to build a better future,” she said.

 

Source: PBS News Hour

A Lifetime of Service

LinkedIn
Montel Williams has served his country for 22 years, and ever since, he’s been serving those who serve in the Armed Forces.

By Brady Rhoades

Montel Williams served his country for 22 years, and ever since, he’s been serving those who serve in the Armed Forces.

Through Military Makeover, which he produces and hosts, the Emmy-award winning TV icon has transformed the homes and lives of hundreds of veterans and their families. The show, which airs on Lifetime TV and AFN, has produced some of the most memorable moments in TV history.

In a February, 2020 episode, Montel and the Military Makeover crew helped Debi, the Gold Star widow of Operation Desert Storm veteran Chris Hixon, who was killed in the 2018 mass shooting at Marjorie Douglas Stoneman High School in Florida while rushing in and trying to disarm the killer.

They stepped in two years after the school shooting that killed Chris and 16 others and made Debi and her two children’s lives a little brighter by, among other things, renovating her kitchen and installing long, floating shelves in several rooms. Debi placed photographs of Chris on those shelves.

Montel — no last name necessary for most people — lives by a simple creed that he learned in boot camp: “We leave no Marine behind,” he says. “I bought into the fact that once a Marine, always a Marine.”

TV personalities Rachael Ray and Montel Williams (C) pose with the 1st Marine Corps District at the 2nd Annual Variety Salute to Service in New York City.
TV personalities Rachael Ray and Montel Williams (C) pose with the 1st Marine Corps District at the 2nd Annual Variety Salute to Service in New York City. (Photo by Jim Spellman/Getty Images)

Montel was the first Black Marine selected to the Naval Academy Prep School to then go on to graduate from the United States Naval Academy.

“In the nearly three decades since I retired from the Navy, I’ve never really taken the uniform off because standing up for those who are serving now—and those who have served—has been the greatest honor of my professional career,” he says,

Most recently, the husband and father of four joined The Balancing Act, also on Lifetime TV, as a co-host. Before that, he shot to stardom on The Montel Williams Show from 1991 to 2008, for which he won an Emmy for Outstanding Talk Show Host.

Military Roots
There’s a lot of tinsel that goes with Hollywood fame, but beneath it are roots, and Montel’s are deep and resilient. He enlisted in the United States Marine Corps in 1974. He then graduated from the Naval Academy in 1980 with a degree in engineering and a minor in international security affairs.

Montel Williams (R) and wife Tara Williams.
Montel Williams (R) and wife Tara Williams.
(Photo by Gilbert Carrasquillo/FilmMagic)

He completed Naval Cryptologic Officer training, and spent 18 months in Guam as a cryptologic officer for naval intelligence. He was later a supervising cryptologic officer with the Naval Security Fleet Support Division at Fort Meade, Maryland. He left the Navy at the rank of lieutenant commander. His awards include the Meritorious Service Medal, Navy Commendation Medal, and the Navy Achievement Medal.

As part of his work in cryptology, Montel teamed with the National Security Agency and was involved in the victory in Grenada in 1983. On several occasions, Montel has worked to get United States citizens — usually military personnel who have been captured in foreign lands — returned to America.

In the 1990s and early part of the 2000s, The Montel Williams Show was synonymous with excellence, empathy and intelligence. Some argue Montel is on the “Mt. Rushmore” of day-time talk show legends, alongside Oprah and others.

In 1999, after years of excruciating pain that, at times, had him crying during commercial breaks, Montel was diagnosed with Multiple Sclerosis. It was bad and good news all at once — bad because MS is painful and debilitating; good because he finally knew what was ailing him and could move forward with treatment.

More than two decades after his diagnosis, Montel lives an active, purposeful life. A fun one, too. One of his favorite activities is snowboarding, which he says helps his balance in day-to-day living.

A Healthy Balance

Montel Williams, Debra Hixon, wife of late Navy Veteran Chris Hixon, his son Corey, and Hixon’s sister-in-law.
From left: Montel Williams, Debra Hixon, wife of late Navy Veteran Chris Hixon, his son Corey, and Hixon’s sister-in-law.

Balance is what makes him a perfect fit for The Balancing Act, a morning show that empowers viewers to live balanced, healthy lives. Montel, who suffered a stroke in 2018, and just keeps going like the Eveready Battery, knows a thing or two about balance. If success is measured by how many people you’ve helped, Montel is rich beyond his monetary millions and accomplished far beyond his worldwide fame.
He goes back again and again to those values he learned in boot camp. Take the following episode of Military Makeover:

After Aaron and Holly Middleton met at a Columbus bar after graduating Ohio State University, it was love at first sight. Though unfamiliar with the rigors of military family life, Holly went all in, giving up her own career to find fulfillment as a mother. Aaron is now a major and senior communications officer serving at USMC Forces Central Command in Tampa, Florida.

The family has faced overwhelming adversity. First, their newborn son, Kelvin, was diagnosed with holes in his lungs, requiring immediate surgeries. Then, unspeakable tragedy struck the family when the Middleton’s’ 5-year-old daughter Scarlett died from an undiagnosed illness.

Montel Williams with Holly and Aaron Middleton, who lost their 5-year-old daughter Scarlett, and began a foundation in her honor, “Scarlett’s Sunshine.”
From left: Montel Williams with Holly and Aaron Middleton, who lost their 5-year-old daughter Scarlett, and began a foundation in her honor, “Scarlett’s Sunshine.”

The shock and trauma of Scarlett’s passing has shaken the family to its core. Scarlett loved picking and giving away flowers, and her favorite song was, “You Are My Sunshine.” Through pain and inspiration, Holly promised to keep alive the joy Scarlett brought to everybody who knew her. The grieving mother created a charity called Scarlett’s Sunshine, using random acts of kindness with flowers to induce spontaneous smiles.

“Little did I know that when I gave people the flowers, and I saw the gratitude on their faces light up, that I would see Scarlett’s light again,” Holly says. “I found her light.” The Middletons’ home in St. Petersburg— the first they’ve owned since Aaron joined the Corps— needed a lot of help. Military Makeover worked to make it a place of healing and solace for this deserving military family.

As the cherry on top, the show donated a year’s worth of flowers to Scarlett’s Sunshine. “It feels like a miracle,” Holly said, when presented with the flowers. Which brought a smile to Montel’s face.

That’s the miracle of Montel’s life, which mirrors the lives of all U.S. veterans.

New Law Requires Large Corporations to Diversify Boards

LinkedIn
A diverse board of directors sitting around a table

By Natalie Rodgers

On August 31, California lawmakers passed a new, unnamed piece of legislature that would increase diversity and inclusion rates in big California businesses.

Under this new law, large corporations would be required to have at least one board member on their team who comes from an underrepresented community. The legislature further clarifies the definition of underrepresented communities to include: Black and African American, Hispanic and Latino, Native American, Native Hawaiian, Alaska Native, Asian, Pacific Islander, or LGBTQ+.

“Corporations have money, power, and influence,” Assemblyman and author of the law Chris Holden stated. “If we are going to address racial injustice and inequity in our society, it’s imperative that corporate boards reflect the diversity of our state.”

Holden hopes that the bill will make large representative changes resulting in racial justice, similar to the gender equality shown after the passing of the 2018 bill, requiring big-name corporations that have a certain number of women on their board.

While presenting the new legislature, lawmakers strived to prove the necessity for its existence by referring to various studies that showed a lack of diversity in big corporations and the state of California alike. One such study, done by the Deloitte and Alliance for Board Diversity in 2018, stated that out of the 1,222 new board members that were introduced to Fortune 100 companies, 940 of them identified as Caucasian, a whopping 77 percent. Another study, done by the Latino Corporate Directors Association in July 2020, stated that 87 percent of California business boards did not have Latino representation, despite making up almost 40 percent of the total population. Many large technology companies, such as Apple and Facebook, were also tested to have all-white executives in the top executive positions on the board.

“There is enough evidence to show there is discrimination,” Holden told lawmakers. “The numbers simply don’t lie.”

Besides the presence of discrimination, lawmakers also showed evidence of the economic impact that diversity can have on large corporations. Companies that present a larger understanding and representation of diversity have shown to increase in profit as their target audience begins to draw in more people from various backgrounds.

Under Holden’s law, diversity would be required to increase in the coming years in California businesses. Corporations with more than nine board members would need to have a minimum of three members that come from underrepresented communities and corporations with  five to eight board members would be required to have at least two of these members. If signed into law by Governor Gavin Newsom, the law would also penalize those violators with fines starting at $100,000.

Air Force general confirmed as first black chief of a U.S. military service

LinkedIn
General Charles Q. Brown in uniform

The Senate on Tuesday confirmed Gen. Charles Q. Brown to be the next Air Force chief of staff, making him the first African American leader of a military service as the Pentagon and the country grapple with a raft of racial issues.

The confirmation also makes Brown the second African American officer to sit on the Joint Chiefs of Staff since Chairman Gen. Colin Powell.

The 98-to-0 vote was a blowout approval for the four-star general. Vice President Mike Pence presided over the historic vote.

President Donald Trump, who nominated Brown in March, hailed the general on Twitter.

“My decision to appoint @usairforce General Charles Brown as the USA’s first-ever African American military service chief has now been approved by the Senate,” Trump said, though the tweet came before the confirmation vote. “A historic day for America! Excited to work even more closely with Gen. Brown, who is a Patriot and Great Leader!”

Brown’s nomination had been in the works for months, yet the vote came amid nationwide protests following the death of George Floyd in police custody. Top Air Force officials led the way in speaking out over the past week and calling for dialogue on racism. Air Force Chief Master Sgt. Kaleth Wright, the service’s top enlisted leader, became the first senior military official to speak out, and was followed by outgoing Chief of Staff Gen. David Goldfein.

Brown, who is currently the commander of Pacific Air Forces, delivered an emotional message Friday about his experience as a black airman.

In addition to becoming the first African American service chief, Brown will be the most senior African American Pentagon leader since Powell chaired the Joint Chiefs from 1989 to 1993.

“I’m thinking about how full I am with emotion, not just for George Floyd but for the many African Americans that have suffered the same fate as George Floyd,” Brown said. “I’m thinking about a history of racial issues and my own experiences that didn’t always sing of liberty and equality.

“Without clear-cut answers, I just want to have the wisdom and knowledge to lead during difficult times like these,” Brown said of his nomination to be the service’s top officer. “I want the wisdom and knowledge to lead, participate in and listen to necessary conversations on racism, diversity and inclusion.”

Continue on to Politico to read the complete article.

BECOMING – OFFICIAL TRAILER

LinkedIn
MIchelle Obama book jacket cover

BECOMING is an intimate look into the life of former First Lady Michelle Obama during a moment of profound change, not only for her personally but also for the country she and her husband served over eight impactful years in the White House.

The film offers a rare and up-close look at her life, taking viewers behind the scenes as she embarks on a 34-city tour that highlights the power of community to bridge our divides and the spirit of connection that comes when we openly and honestly share our stories.

Film Release Date: May 6, 2020
Format: Original Documentary Feature

Directed by: Nadia Hallgren
Produced by: Katy Chevigny,
Marilyn Ness, & Lauren Cioffi
Co-Producer: Maureen A. Ryan
Executive Producers:
Priya Swaminathan & Tonia Davis

A NOTE FROM MICHELLE
I’m excited to let you know that on May 6, Netflix will release BECOMING, a documentary film directed by Nadia Hallgren that looks at my life and the experiences I had while touring following the release of my memoir. Those months I spent traveling—meeting and connecting with people in cities across the globe—drove home the idea that what we share in common is deep and real and can’t be messed with.

In groups large and small, young and old, unique and united, we came together and shared stories, filling those spaces with our joys, worries, and dreams.

*BECOMING is the third release from Higher Ground Productions and Netflix*

To view the documentary now available on Netflix visit, netflix.com/Becoming.

#IAmBecoming

Former NAACP President Kweisi Mfume Wins Seat Held By Late Congressman Elijah Cummings

LinkedIn
Kweisi Mfume headshot

It’s finally official. Former NAACP president Kweisi Mfume will finish the term of the late Democratic congressman Elijah Cummings after winning an election for his Maryland seat Tuesday.

In a special election structured around a largely mail-in vote, Mfume, who led the NAACP from 1996 to 2004, beat Republican Kimberly Klacik for the heavily Democratic 7th Congressional District, which Cummings had held from 1996 until his death last October.

Mfume had held the seat for a decade prior to Cummings being elected, but resigned to lead the NAACP.

Mfume, 71, acknowledged that voters cast their ballots in the shadow of the gripping coronavirus pandemic which has sharply affected the district, including much of Baltimore.

“To them, to their families and to the families of so many others who have lost lives prematurely to this disease,” Mfume said in his address after winning, according to the Associated Press. “I want all of you to know that from day one, all of my attention, all of my energy and all of my focus in the United States Congress will be on using science, data and common sense to help get our nation through this dark hour in our history.”

Only three polling stations were open to voters because of social distancing measures. Ballots were otherwise sent weeks in advance for mail-in voting. The strategy was an alternative to voting practices a few weeks ago in the Wisconsin primary several weeks ago when voters were forced to stand in lines for hours to cast ballots, putting them at higher risk for coronavirus spread.

Continue on to BET to read the complete article.

America's Leading African American Business and Career Magazine

Lumen

Lumen

American Family Ins

American Family Insurance

Verizon

verizon

Leidos

Upcoming Events

  1. 2021 ERG & Council Conference
    September 15, 2021 - September 17, 2021

Upcoming Events

  1. 2021 ERG & Council Conference
    September 15, 2021 - September 17, 2021