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Meghan Markle adds children’s book author to her resume

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Meghan Markle smiling away from the camera wearing a tan sleeveless blazer

By Kerry Justich, Yahoo! Life

Meghan Markle is adding published author to her resume after writing a children’s book that’s set to be released on June 8.

The Duchess of Sussex’s secret project is titled The Bench, according to an announcement by Penguin Random House, and is about “the special bond between father and son — as seen through a mother’s eyes.” The story is inspired by the relationship between Markle’s husband Prince Harry and son Archie, who turns two years old on Thursday. The book is also illustrated by artist Christian Robinson.

“The Bench started as a poem I wrote for my husband on Father’s Day, the month after Archie was born,” Meghan, The Duchess of Sussex, said in a statement. “That poem became this story. Christian layered in beautiful and ethereal watercolor illustrations that capture the warmth, joy, and comfort of the relationship between fathers and sons from all walks of life; this representation was particularly important to me, and Christian and I worked closely to depict this special bond through an inclusive lens. My hope is that The Bench resonates with every family, no matter the makeup, as much as it does with mine.”

The book comes as a surprise after the couple signed a multi-year deal with Netflix to produce documentaries, feature films, scripted television series and children’s series last fall. But the move still makes sense for the soon-to-be mother-of-two who told Oprah that “the most important title I’ll ever have is mom.” Markle is even set to narrate the audiobook edition.

Click here to read the full article on Yahoo! Life.

‘Ma Rainey’s’ hair and makeup team make history with Oscar win

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Viola Davis as Ma Rainey in “Ma Rainey’s Black Bottom" standing in front of a microphone with her right arm in the air while she sings

MARK OLSEN, LA Times

The hair and makeup team behind “Ma Rainey’s Black Bottom” — Sergio Lopez-Rivera, Mia Neal, and Jamika Wilson — made history when they were nominated for the Oscar, with Neal and Wilson being the first Black people recognized in the category. Now they have made history again as that category’s winners.

The team transformed Viola Davis into 1920s blues singer Ma Rainey, who, in the Netflix adaptation of August Wilson’s celebrated play, is seen during the course of one day spent largely in a sweltering Chicago recording studio. There are precious few photographs of the real-life Ma Rainey, so the team had to extrapolate much of its work from additional research.

Creating a period-accurate horsehair wig and a makeup look that would run and smear just so as the story progressed, the team devised a look that was part glamour and part grit, moving from precisely pulled-together to deliriously disheveled

Neal created the wigs; Wilson, Davis’ longtime hairstylist, put them on the actress. As makeup artist Lopez-Rivera, who also has a long-running collaboration with Davis, said of the character’s makeup and overall look, including her sweat, in an interview with The Times, “It was applied precisely to look messy.”

In accepting the award, Neal spoke of her grandfather, who was a Tuskegee Airman, represented the U.S. in the first Pan-Am Games and graduated from Northwestern University yet was barred from a job as a teacher because he was Black.

“So I want to say thank you to our ancestors who put the work in, were denied but never gave up,” Neal said. “And I also stand here as Jamika and I break this glass ceiling with so much excitement for the future. Because I can picture Black trans women standing up here and Asian sisters and our Latina sisters and Indigenous women. And I know that one day it won’t be unusual or groundbreaking, it will just be normal.”

Click here to read the full article in the LA Times.

Kimberly Godwin Named President of ABC News

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Headshot of Kimberly Godwin

The Walt Disney Co. has named Kimberly Godwin president of ABC News.

Godwin, a longtime producer and executive at CBS News, will become the first Black woman to lead a broadcast news division. She succeeds James Goldston, who stepped down as president of ABC News earlier this year.

Godwin will start at ABC in early May and report to Peter Rice, chairman of Disney General Entertainment Content.

A top deputy to CBS News president Susan Zirinsky, Godwin was most recently executive vp news at CBS, overseeing all newsgathering worldwide for the venerable broadcast news division. She also had oversight of newsrooms at all the CBS-owned and operated TV stations.

Godwin also stepped in as ep of the CBS Evening News, helping to launch the revamped newscast under anchor Norah O’Donnell. She also served as executive director for development and diversity at CBS News, and as a senior broadcast producer for the Evening News. Before joining CBS News in 2007, she spent more than 20 years working in local TV newsrooms across the country, including leadership roles at WCBS New York, KNBC Los Angeles and KXAS in Dallas.

“Kim is an instinctive and admired executive whose unique experiences, strengths and strategic vision made her the ideal choice to lead the outstanding team at ABC News and build on their incredible success,” said Rice in a statement announcing the hire. “Throughout Kim’s career in global news organizations and local newsrooms, she has distinguished herself as a fierce advocate for excellence, collaboration, inclusion and the vital role of accurate and transparent news reporting.”

“I have immense respect and admiration for ABC News,” added Godwin in a statement. “As the most trusted brand in news, they are to be commended for the extraordinary work and dedication of the journalists, producers, executives and their teams across the organization. I am honored to take on this stewardship and excited for what we will achieve together.”

Photo Credit: The Hollywood Reporter via ABC/ Heidi Gutman

Continue reading the full article at The Hollywood Reporter

In ‘Them,’ a Black Family Is Haunted by Real-Life Monsters

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From left, Deborah Ayorinde, Melody Hurd, Shahadi Wright Joseph and Ashley Thomas in “Them,” a new horror series from Amazon. The malevolent force at work here is racism.Credit...

Want to hear a scary story? Here’s one: A family reckoning with a senseless, pervasive horror flees home to what they hope will be a place of safety and prosperity, only to find themselves pursued by that same demented presence.

Evil forces gather — their new home is haunted, too. Bloody visions terrorize them day and night. The dog is poisoned. It’s only a matter of time before the bodies start mounting.

PHOTO: NYTIMES

But in the 10-part Amazon series “Them,” as in any good horror story, there is a twist: The victims are simply a middle-class Black family in the 1950s, seeking a better life in a Los Angeles suburb; the senseless horror is the racism of their white neighbors, who want them out. As the situation devolves, certain terrifying events may be supernatural, or they may be psychological.

And yet, as the series, the first season of which drops on Friday, asks: Does that distinction matter when the danger is ever-present?

“As the sinister elements outside the home ratchet up, that obviously allows for the cracks and fissures within each of them to be infiltrated by something malevolent,” the series’s creator, Little Marvin, said of the Black family at the center of “Them.” “But that malevolent thing, as sure as there is a supernatural component to our story, is deeply rooted in the emotional and psychological lives of these characters.”

It must get hard to believe your own eyes when your senses are being shocked over and over by cruelty, I said.

“Welcome to being Black,” Little Marvin replied.

Welcome, also, to the legacy of codified racism in America, which provided Little Marvin with a conceptual starting point for “Them.” Like the Jordan Peele film “Get Out” or last summer’s HBO hit “Lovecraft Country,” “Them,” which counts Lena Waithe as an executive producer, uses horror-genre conventions as allegorical octane for racist machinery that is all too real. And as “Watchmen” did for the 1921 Tulsa Race Massacre, the show is likely to educate many viewers on an ugly relic of American history that is not widely acknowledged: racially restrictive housing covenants.

If real estate legalese doesn’t sound like fodder for an edge-of-your-seat horror story, consider the implications. Just as government redlining helped create and reinforce segregation by determining who was eligible for mortgages, racial covenants did the same by restricting who was allowed to buy a property at all, finances be damned. A deed might explicitly forbid all owners, present and future, from selling the home to anyone of African or Asian descent. Many older deeds still bear such language

“Any house that was built between 1938 and 1948, in a subdivision, I would be surprised for it not to have racial restrictions in them,” said Carol M. Rose, a professor emeritus at Yale Law School who has studied racial covenants extensively. Those restrictions, Rose explained, which first appeared in the late 19th century, exploded in the early 20th century as farmlands were subdivided for large swaths of new housing

Racial covenants were notoriously common around northern cities like Detroit and Chicago — the Midwest didn’t mandate separate drinking fountains, but segregation and violence were just as real. And California was no different. A Supreme Court decision in 1948, Shelley v. Kraemer, made racial covenants no longer enforceable, creating opportunities for nonwhite families in places like Compton, Calif., where “Them” is set.

Deprived of a legal means of keeping their neighborhoods white, some racists resorted to extralegal methods, which is where the horror really begins. Sometimes the method was vandalism. Others, a Molotov cocktail.

“California is part of the story because people think that California is this sort of easy, breezy racial space, and no, it’s terrible,” said Jeannine Bell, a law professor at Indiana University who wrote “Hate Thy Neighbor,” a book about the violence faced by people in integrating neighborhoods. “It’s terrible for precisely the reasons that this series explores. The methods used in the Midwest were also used in California.”

The Emory family of “Them” flees the South as part of the Great Migration, in which, from 1916 to 1970, an estimated 6 million Black people left the region for cities of the North and West. Like them, the Emorys seek economic opportunity; the father, Henry (Ashley Thomas), is a college-educated engineer and World War II veteran, and he has relatives in the Los Angeles neighborhood of Watts. When he lands a job out West, the family hits the road.

Read the full article at NYtimes.com

THE WEEKND DONATES $1 MIL FOR 2 MILLION MEALS … To Help Ethiopians

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A headshot of the weeknd from a concert of his with the WFP logo next to him

By TMZ

The Weeknd is getting involved with the military conflict in Ethiopia — donating a million dollars, which will provide food for people who need it there.

The singer, who is of Ethiopian descent himself, partnered with World Food Program USA — a UN World Food Programme affiliate — to send over a million bucks toward relief efforts in the North African country … which has been mired with bloodshed and chaos for months. Specifically, Abel’s money will provide the equivalent of 2 million meals for citizens there who have been caught in the middle of the feuding factions … many of whom are running out of resources, like food.

TW says, “My heart breaks for my people of Ethiopia as innocent civilians ranging from small children to the elderly are being senselessly murdered and entire villages are being displaced out of fear and destruction.” He goes on to encourage others who can to donate as well.

If you haven’t heard, Ethiopia has been embroiled in a bitter battle with its own people since November — when Prime Minister Abiy Ahmed ordered an attack on the Tigray People’s Liberation Front — the ruling party in the northern part of the region.

Click here to read the full article on TMZ!

Beyonce Makes History Winning The Most NAACP Image Awards

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Beyonce performing in a rose gold off-the-shoulder gown with built in cape from Ralph and Russo’s Fall 2018 couture collection

Beyonce has made history at the 2021 NAACP Image Awards.

The music icon now has the most NAACP Image Awards in history after she racked up four awards for the 52nd event, NAACP president and CEO Derrick Johnson announced on Saturday.

The NAACP Image Awards hosted a series of non-televised virtual events recognizing winners in over 60 categories in the five days leading up to its televised ceremony on Saturday. The two-hour virtual event, which was hosted by Anthony Anderson, aired live across ViacomCBS networks including BET and CBS.

Beyonce took home wins in the Outstanding Female Artist, Outstanding Hip Hop/Rap Song, Outstanding Duo, Group or Collaboration (Traditional), and Outstanding Duo, Group or Collaboration (Contemporary) categories during a virtual event on Thursday.

Johnson celebrated Beyoncé’s achievement on Twitter, writing, “Congratulations
@Beyonce on winning the most #NAACPImageAwards in history!”

Representatives for the NAACP Image Awards did not immediately return requests to confirm Beyoncé’s total tally of wins, but the “Black Parade” artist has won at least 20 Image Awards as a solo artist since the 2004 ceremony when she first won the Entertainer of the Year award. She won that award again in 2019. Her former group, Destiny’s Child, racked up a handful of wins in the Outstanding Duo or Group category in the early to mid-2000s.

Beyoncé has already made music award history this month.

She won four awards at the Grammys on March 14, bringing her total wins to 28 ― the most Grammys won by a female artist.

Click here to read the full article on HuffPost.

Dwayne Johnson reveals new ‘Black Adam’ release date

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Animated photo of Dwayne Johnson as a super hero surrounded by electricity rays.

By Toyin Owoseje, CNN

There have been some roadblocks along the way — but Dwayne Johnson is one step closer to living his dream of being a superhero. The Hollywood actor and former wrestler has announced that his DC Comics movie “Black Adam” will now debut in July 2022.

Johnson, who plays the powerful villain attempting to redeem himself, took to Instagram on Sunday to share video footage from Times Square, showing an animated graphic of the movie plastered across the New York landmark’s digital screens.
As the premiere date appears in flashing neon lights, an ominous voice-over declares: “The hierarchy of power in the DC Universe is about to change.”

“A disruptive and unstoppable global force of a message from the man in black himself. ‘Black Adam’ is coming July 29, 2022,” the caption on the Instagram post reads.

“Black Adam” will mark Johnson’s debut as the DC character, who is the enemy of Shazam — played by Zachary Levi in the DC Extended Universe.

Revealing the project in 2019, Johnson said the role of Black Adam was “unlike any other I’ve ever played in my career.”

“As a kid, Superman was the hero I always wanted to be. But, a few years into my fantasy, I realized that Superman was the hero, I could never be. I was too rebellious. Too rambunctious. Too resistant to convention and authority,” he wrote in an Instagram post.

He added that Black Adam is “blessed by magic with the powers equal to SUPERMAN, but the difference is he doesn’t toe the mark or walk the line. He’s a rebellious, one-of-a-kind superhero, who’ll always do what’s right for the people – but he does it his way.

Click here to read the full article on CNN.

NAACP ANNOUNCES WINNERS OF THE 52nd NAACP IMAGE AWARDS LIVE ON BET HOSTED BY ANTHONY ANDERSON

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NAACP 52nd image awards promo poster

President Joe Biden and Vice President Kamala Harris kicked-off the night in a special recorded message highlighting the importance of the NAACP and saluting its work. The star-studded evening featured appearances from Alicia Keys, Andra Day, Arsenio Hall, Cynthia Erivo, Lin-Manuel Miranda, Martin Lawerence, Michelle Obama, Misty Copeland, Regina King, Samuel L. Jackson, the cast of Tyler Perry’s Sistas, Swizz Beatz, Tracy Morgan, Will Smith, and Mc Lyte.

Following the week-long virtual experience, on Saturday, March 27th, the NAACP celebrated the stellar achievements of the 52nd NAACP Image Awards winners during a special LIVE broadcast on BET and simulcast across ViacomCBS networks including CBS for its first time, as well as BET Her, Comedy Central, Logo, MTV, MTV2, Paramount, Pop, Smithsonian, TV Land, VH1, BET PLUTO, and CMT.

Winners of the night included D-NICE (Entertainer of the Year), Viola Davis (Outstanding Actress in a Drama Series – “How To Get Away With Murder” and Outstanding Actress in a Motion Picture- “Ma Rainey’s Black Bottom”), Regé-Jean Page (Outstanding Actor in a Drama Series  –“Bridgerton”), Issa Rae (Outstanding Actress in a Comedy Series – “Insecure”), Stacey Abrams (Social Justice Impact) and “Bad Boys For Life” starring  Will Smith and Martin Lawrence (Outstanding Motion Picture).

The late Chadwick Boseman won the award for Outstanding Actor in a Motion Picture – “Ma Rainey’s Black Bottom”. Chadwick’s wife, Taylor Simone Ledward, accepted the award in his honor, encouraging fans to be proactive about their health and visit StandUpToCancer.org for more information about detecting the signs of colon cancer.

Stacey Abrams up close in purple holding microphone
Stacey Abrams (Social Justice Impact)

During the ceremony, legendary entertainer, film icon and two-time Image Award recipient Eddie Murphy was inducted into the acclaimed NAACP Image Awards Hall Of Fame. The Hall of Fame Award was presented by Eddie Murphy’s collaborator and long-time friend Arsenio Hall.

NAACP President and CEO, Derrick Johnson, presented NBA superstar, business entrepreneur, and philanthropist, LeBron James, with the President’s Award which was presented in recognition of a special achievement and distinguished public service.

Civil Rights Movement Icon Rev. D. James Lawson, was recognized with the NAACP Chairman’s Award during the ceremony. In his acceptance speech, he recalled a time in High School in 1944, where he went door-to-door soliciting memberships for his local NAACP chapter in Ohio.

Image Award Outstanding Female Artist nominee Jazmine Sullivan, kicked-off the music portion with an electrifying performance of “Pick Up Your Feelings” from her latest album Heaux Tales. Additionally, Grammy Award-winning singer Maxwell took to the stage to celebrate the 25th anniversary of his debut album Urban Hang Suite, performing “Ascension (Don’t Ever Wonder)”.

Additional guest appearances included Alicia Keys, Andra Day, Arsenio Hall, Cynthia Erivo, Lin-Manuel Miranda, Michelle Obama, Misty Copeland, Regina King, Samuel L. Jackson, the cast of Tyler Perry’s Sistas, Swizz Beatz, and Tracy Morgan. MC Lyte served as the night’s Voice Over announcer.

Eddie Murphy smiling holding microphone
Eddie Murphy NAACP Image Awards Hall Of Fame Inductee

Tonight’s LIVE show followed the week long NAACP Image Awards Virtual Experience, which invited fans to join the Image Awards in a celebration of “Black Excellence”–including the non-televised awards program, virtual red carpet, and a curated conversation series. The Virtual Experience additionally played host to the night’s post-show virtual afterparty which featured classic cuts by DJ Questlove, current cuts by DJ Kiss, and a Jazz Lounge performance by Robert Glasper and Lalah Hathaway. Fans can relive all of the Image Awards moments from the week in the Virtual Experience’s NAACP Theatre at virtualexperience.naacpimageawards.net.

The 52nd NAACP Image Awards is presented by Wells Fargo, and sponsored by AT&T, FedEx, Nike, Bank of America, American Airlines, Airbnb, Alaska Airlines, AARP, Ford, and Hilton.

The NAACP Image Awards honors the accomplishments of people of color in the fields of television, music, literature, and film and also recognizes individuals or groups who promote social justice through creative endeavors.

For all information and the latest news, please follow NAACP Image Awards on Instagram @NAACPImageAwards.

NAACP

Founded in 1909 in response to the ongoing violence against Black people around the country, the NAACP (National Association for the Advancement of Colored People) is the largest and most pre-eminent civil rights organization in the nation. We have over 2,200 units and branches across the nation, along with well over 2M activists. Our mission is to secure the political, educational, social, and economic equality of rights in order to eliminate race-based discrimination and ensure the health and well-being of all persons.

NOTE: The Legal Defense Fund – also referred to as the NAACP-LDF was founded in 1940 as a part of the NAACP but separated in 1957 to become a completely separate entity. It is recognized as the nation’s first civil and human rights law organization, and shares our commitment to equal rights.

Anthony Anderson host of the 52nd annual NAACP Image Awards
Anthony Anderson host of the 52nd annual NAACP Image Awards

About BET:

BET, a subsidiary of ViacomCBS Inc. (NASDAQ: VIACA, VIAC), is the nation’s leading provider of quality entertainment, music, news and public affairs television programming for the African-American audience. The primary BET channel is in 90 million households and can be seen in the United States, Canada, the Caribbean, the United Kingdom, sub-Saharan Africa and France. BET is the dominant African-American consumer brand with a diverse group of business extensions including BET.com, a leading Internet destination for Black entertainment, music, culture, and news; BET HER, a 24-hour entertainment network targeting the African-American Woman; BET Music Networks – BET Jams, BET Soul and BET Gospel; BET Home Entertainment; BET Live, BET’s growing festival business; BET Mobile, which provides ringtones, games and video content for wireless devices; and BET International, which operates BET around the globe.

Following is the complete list of winners for the 52nd NAACP Image Awards:

LIVE SHOW CATEGORIES

Outstanding Actor in a Drama Series

Regé-Jean Page – “Bridgerton”

Outstanding Actress in a Drama Series

Viola Davis – “How To Get Away With Murder”

Outstanding Actress in a Comedy Series

Issa Rae – “Insecure”

Outstanding Actress in a Motion Picture

Viola Davis – “Ma Rainey’s Black Bottom”

Outstanding Actor in a Motion Picture

Chadwick Boseman – “Ma Rainey’s Black Bottom”

Outstanding Motion Picture

“Bad Boys For Life”

Chairman’s Award

Rev. D. James Lawson

President’s Award

LeBron James

Hall of Fame Award

Eddie Murphy

Entertainer of the Year

D-Nice

Social Justice Impact

Stacey Abrams

NON-TELEVISED AWARDS

Outstanding Social Media Personality

Tabitha Brown

Outstanding Literary Work – Fiction

“The Awkward Black Man” – Walter Mosley

Outstanding Literary Work – Nonfiction        

“A Promised Land” – Barack Obama

Outstanding Literary Work – Debut Author

“We’re Better Than This” – Elijah Cummings

Outstanding Literary Work – Biography/Autobiography   

“The Dead Are Arising” – Les Payne, Tamara Payne

Outstanding Literary Work – Instructional    

“Vegetable Kingdom” – Bryant Terry

Outstanding Literary Work – Poetry

“The Age of Phillis” – Honorée Jeffers

Outstanding Literary Work – Children           

“She Was the First!: The Trailblazing Life of Shirley Chisholm” – Katheryn Russell-Brown, Eric Velasquez          

Outstanding Literary Work – Youth/Teens  

“Before the Ever After” – Jacqueline Woodson

Outstanding Directing in a Documentary (Television or Motion Picture) 

Keith McQuirter – “By Whatever Means Necessary: The Times of Godfather of Harlem”

Outstanding Writing in a Documentary (Television or Motion Picture)     

Melissa Haizlip – “Mr. SOUL!”

Outstanding Documentary (Film)

“John Lewis: Good Trouble”

Outstanding Documentary (Television – Series or Special)

“The Last Dance”

Special Award – Youth Activist of the Year

Madison Potts

Special Award – Activist of the Year

Reverend Dr. Wendell Anthony

Outstanding Writing in a Comedy Series

Michaela Coel – “I May Destroy You” – Ep. 112 “Ego Death”

Outstanding Writing in a Drama Series 

Attica Locke – “Little Fires Everywhere” – Ep. 104 “The Spider Web”

Outstanding Writing in a Television Movie or Special       

Geri Cole – “The Power of We: A Sesame Street Special”

Outstanding Writing in a Motion Picture     

Radha Blank – “The Forty-Year-Old Version”

Outstanding Directing in a Comedy Series  

Anya Adams – “black-ish” – Ep. 611 “Hair Day”

Outstanding Directing in a Drama Series  

Hanelle Culpepper – “Star Trek: Picard” – Ep. 101 “Remembrance”

Outstanding Directing in a Television Movie or Special  

Eugene Ashe – “Sylvie’s Love”

Outstanding Directing in a Motion Picture  

Gina Prince-Bythewood – “The Old Guard”

Outstanding Short Form Series – Comedy or Drama

“#FreeRayshawn“

Outstanding Performance in a Short Form

Laurence Fishburne – “#FreeRayshawn”

Outstanding Short Form Series – Reality/Nonfiction 

“Between The Scenes” – The Daily Show with Trevor Noah

Outstanding Short-Film (Live Action)

“Black Boy Joy”

Outstanding Short-Film (Animated)

“Canvas”

Special Award – Spingarn Medal

Misty Copeland

Outstanding Talk Series

Red Table Talk

Outstanding Reality Program/Reality Competition or Game Show

Celebrity Family Feud

Outstanding Variety Show (Series or Special)

VERZUZ

Outstanding News/Information (Series or Special)

The New York Times Presents “The Killing of Breonna Taylor”

Outstanding Children’s Program

Family Reunion

Outstanding Performance by a Youth (Series, Special, Television Movie or Limited-Series)

Marsai Martin – “Black-ish”

Outstanding Animated Series           

Doc McStuffins

Outstanding Animated Motion Picture

Soul

Outstanding Character Voice-Over Performance (Television)        

Laya DeLeon Hayes – “Doc McStuffins”

Outstanding Character Voice-Over Performance – Motion Picture

Jamie Foxx – “Soul”

Outstanding Host in a Talk or News/Information (Series or Special) – Individual or Ensemble   

Trevor Noah – “The Daily Show with Trevor Noah”

Outstanding Host in a Reality/Reality Competition, Game Show or Variety (Series or Special) – Individual or Ensemble   

Steve Harvey – “Celebrity Family Feud”

Outstanding Guest Performance – Comedy or Drama Series          

Loretta Devine- “P-Valley”

Outstanding Breakthrough Creative (Television)    

Raynelle Swilling – “Cherish the Day”

Special Award – Founder’s

Toni Vaz

Outstanding New Artist        

Doja Cat – “Say So”

Outstanding Male Artist       

Drake – “Laugh Now, Cry Later”

Outstanding Female Artist    

Beyoncé – “Black Parade”

Outstanding Soul/R&B Song

“Do It” – Chloe x Halle

Outstanding Hip Hop/Rap Song       

“Savage Remix” – Megan Thee Stallion feat. Beyoncé

Outstanding Duo, Group or Collaboration (Traditional)     

Chloe x Halle – “Wonder What She Thinks Of Me”

Outstanding Duo, Group or Collaboration (Contemporary)           

Megan Thee Stallion feat. Beyoncé – “Savage Remix”

Outstanding Album   

“Chilombo” – Jhené Aiko

Outstanding Producer of the Year

Hit-Boy

Outstanding Music Video/Visual Album      

“Brown Skin Girl” – Beyonce’ feat WizKid, SAINt JHN, Blue Ivy Carter

Outstanding Jazz Album – Instrumental       

“Music From and Inspired By Soul” – Jon Batiste

Outstanding Jazz Album – Vocal       

“Holy Room – Live at Alte Oper” – Somi

Outstanding International Song       

“Lockdown” – Original Koffee

Outstanding Soundtrack/Compilation Album         

“Soul” Original Motion Picture Soundtrack – Trent Reznor, Atticus Ross, Jon Batiste and Tom MacDougall

Outstanding Gospel/Christian Song

“Touch from you” – Tamela Mann

Outstanding Gospel/Christian Album          

“The Return” – The Clark Sisters

Special Award – Sports Award II

WNBA Player’s Association (Nneka Ogqumike accepting on behalf of WNBAPA)

‘The Falcon and the Winter Soldier’ Star Anthony Mackie Soars to Marvel Leading-Man Status

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Anthony Mackie looking off in the distance in a press photo for a red carpet event

By Matt Donnelly of Variety.com

For his entire tenure as an Avenger, Anthony Mackie had never been the first name on the call sheet.

In a galaxy of stars populated by Robert Downey Jr., Chris Evans and Scarlett Johansson, the actor was aware of his place in the on-set pecking order, but would never miss an opportunity to make his presence felt.

“Number six on the call sheet has arrived!” Mackie would routinely shout on films like “Captain America: Civil War” and the box office-busting “Infinity Saga” sequels, according to Marvel chief creative officer Kevin Feige.

It exemplifies the sort of winning tone that the 42-year-old actor has brought to his superhero character the Falcon, aka Sam Wilson, for six movies from the top-earning studio — wry and collegial humor, with the potential to turn explosive at any moment. Both Mackie and his character are set to burn brighter than ever when the Disney Plus series “The Falcon and the Winter Soldier” lands on March 18.

On that call sheet, “Anthony is No. 1,” Feige is happy to report, “but it still says ‘No. 6.’ He kept it because he didn’t want it to go to his head.” The series is essentially a two-hander with his friend and longtime co-star Sebastian Stan, the titular soldier. All six episodes were produced and directed by Emmy winner Kari Skogland (“The Handmaid’s Tale,” “The Loudest Voice”). The series, for which combined Super Bowl TV spot and trailer viewership earned a record-breaking 125 million views this year, is reported to have cost $150 million in total.

For Mackie, though, the show comes at a critical time for both his career and for representation in the MCU. Sam Wilson is graduating from handy wingman (Falcon literally gets his job done with the use of mechanical wings), having been handed the Captain America shield by Evans in the last “Avengers” film. While it’s unclear if he will formally don the superhero’s star-spangled uniform moving forward (as the character did in a 2015 comic series), global fandoms and the overall industry are still reeling from the loss of Chadwick Boseman, who portrayed Marvel’s Black Panther to culture-defining effect. With this new story, Mackie will become the most visible African American hero in the franchise. And when asked whether he’ll be taking the mantle of one of its most iconic characters, he doesn’t exactly say no.

“I was really surprised and affected by the idea of possibly getting the shield and becoming Captain America. I’ve been in this business a long time, and I did it the way they said you’re supposed to do it. I didn’t go to L.A. and say, ‘Make me famous.’ I went to theater school, did Off Broadway, did indie movies and worked my way through the ranks. It took a long time for this shit to manifest itself the way it has, and I’m extremely happy about that,” Mackie says.

Feige says that, especially with the advent of Disney Plus and the freedom afforded long-form storytelling, the moment was right to give the Falcon his due.

Photo Credit:  Vittorio Zunino Celotto/Getty Images)

Click here to read the full article at Variety.com 

Miko Marks is blazing trail again as Black women find place in country music

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Singer Miko Marks poses for a portrait outside a studio

By Andrew Gilbert, Datebook

Nashville can be a lonely place for a Black woman breaking into the country music scene. And Miko Marks knows this firsthand.

The Oakland singer, who recorded two well-regarded albums during a Tennessee sojourn in the mid-aughts, said she found a warm welcome just about everywhere she performed except for the home of country music itself.

“I was always open to wherever my path would lead, but things did not work out in Nashville,” Marks said, noting that she felt fitting in required tamping down her identity.

Music City may not have been ready for Marks, but she helped clear a country music trail for other Black women, and now she’s getting back on the horse with her first new album in 14 years. Working closely with the creative team at the recently launched East Palo Alto label Redtone Records, Marks recorded “Our Country,” a rollicking, gospel music-infused session that thrums to the justice-seeking frequency of Black Lives Matter.

“These songs were made out of the experience we’re going through right now,” said Marks, who celebrates the album’s Friday, March 26, release with an acoustic performance that will be live-streamed on her YouTube channel and Facebook page. “The music is there to speak to the times.”

Miko Marks sins autographs in front of a wall of her album covers
Miko Marks is blazing trail again as Black women find place in country music. Photo: Paul Chinn, The Chronicle 2008

The album grew out of a vivid dream Marks had, but not in the sense of fulfilling a long-held ambition. Rather, late in the summer of 2019, she literally dreamed about musicians she hadn’t worked with for more than a decade. A quick phone call put her back in touch with Justin Phipps and Steve Wyreman, the Redtone Records founders who perform together as the Resurrectors.

Phipps and Wyreman were excited to get back in touch with Marks and realized a song they’d recently written, “Goodnight America,” would be ideal for her rich contralto. An elegy for a country headed in the wrong direction, “it didn’t fit anyone we were currently working with,” Phipps said. “When Miko reached out, we sent it to her and she sat with it for a while. Ultimately, she felt it resonated with where she was and where she wanted to be going.”

When Marks released the song as a video last year, a few weeks before the pandemic lockdown, it was definitely a departure from where she’d been. Before “Goodnight America,” she’d always avoided taking a political stance in her music, preferring to focus on personal themes. With “Our Country,” she’s jumped into the fray.

“I definitely feel like there’s a conversation being had that’s long overdue,” Marks said. “I am hopeful. I feel that the times are different than when I started out.”

Marks grew up with gospel music, singing in church in Flint, Mich., “but I was always drawn to country music,” she said. “Loretta and Patsy, Kenny Rogers and ‘Hee Haw’ were huge in my household. It was a normal thing. It wasn’t until I was older that there was this line clearly drawn, but country music has its roots in Black music. Even the banjo is from Africa.”

She met her San Francisco-raised husband David Hawkins when they were students at Grambling State University in Louisiana, and by 1996 the couple settled in the Bay Area. Though she loved singing, Marks said she wouldn’t have pursued a career in music without Hawkins’ encouragement, and after recording a Jeffrey Wood-produced demo at Fantasy Studios in Berkeley, she decided to give up her day job in San Francisco as a legal secretary and try her luck in Nashville.

Working with producer Ron Cornelius at Mirrome Records, she released her debut album, “Freeway Bound,” in 2005 and followed it up with 2007’s “It Feels Good.” Both albums featured first-call studio talent that caught the attention of mainstream country music audiences. And yet, while the sessions were well received, the indie label couldn’t break Marks into country radio and it became clear that Nashville didn’t really know what to do with her.

In 2006, the Bay Area welcomed her back. Marks became one of the region’s most visible country music singers, performing everywhere from the Bill Pickett Invitational Rodeo and San Francisco’s Pier 23 to the Saddle Rack in Fremont and Oakland’s Overland (the latter two permanently shuttered during the pandemic).

Click here to read the full article on Datebook.

Power: LaKeisha star LaLa Anthony reunites with 50 Cent for huge new Starz project

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LaLa Anthony as LaKeisha on the set of Power seated next to co star.

By LISA WEHRSTEDT, Express UK

After her amazing performance as LaKeisha on the Starz show Power, LaLa Anthony has now landed a major new role alongside Power producer Curtis “50 Cent” Jackson, on an upcoming drama. Inspired by true events, Black Mafia Family will tell the story of two brothers from 1980’s Detroit who started one of the most influential crime family in the country.

LaLa Anthony will plat Markaisha Taylor, the wife to flamboyant drug dealer and head of the family Demetrius “Big Meech” Flenory.

She is also best friend to her husband’s brother and fellow boss Terry “Southwest T” Flenory, which will make for some interesting dynamics as family loyalty is called into question.

The brothers’ vision is to take their business beyond the drug trade and into the world of hip-hop to become global icons.

Meanwhile, Markaisha has her own plan to harness Terry’s seriousness and sense of purpose to make herself rich.

As the two grow closer and ultimately intimate, their relationship will mean the demise of Markaisha’s marriage as well as Terry’s reputation on the streets.

Snoop Dogg has also joined the cast as Pastor Swift, the Flenory family’s spiritual advisor.

His character description reads: “He’s a man of The Word, with the aura of an ex-con.”

“The Pastor believes in the power of the Lord, and does his best to keep Meech and Terry in good graces.”

He will eventually make his way into the family and become a close confidant, although “Meech and Terry’s father resents all the attention the Pastor showers over the Flenory’s family, but no one can deny all the good the Pastor does for them.”

Joining the show is also Serayah, who will play Demetrius’s girlfriend, Lori Walker.

She is a smart, driven, yet naive college athlete who fell for Meech’s bad boy charm when the couple was younger.

After having a daughter with him, Lori is now more mature and clear-eyed.

Her world centres more around her daughter, and she expects less out of Meech, which makes him want her more.

Click here to read the full article on Express UK.

Master P Changes Focus from Owning NBA Team to Owning an HBCU

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Master P posing with his hand over his mouth, wearing a suit and glasses

By Will Moss, HBCU Connect

The recent highlighting of Historically Black Colleges and Universities has led many to learn that most of these schools were founded on land grants provided by the government during the Reconstruction Era. Realizing this has motivated Master P to take matters into his own hands to change the future.

Master P took to Instagram where he revealed his life goal has now changed.

“I used to want to own an NBA team but now I want to own a HBCU,” opens his video’s caption.

“This message is all about educating our people,” Master P said in the video. “Anybody that’s listening to this and has a business, I want y’all to join this movement with me. We need to make sure our kids get educated the way other the cultures are educated.”

The spotlight has been refocused on HBCUs in recent years. Michael B. Jordan created a basketball invitational to showcase talent at the institutions and the NBA has put an emphasis on supporting them. During the NBA All-Star Game, the league generated $3 million that will be used to promote these colleges and universities.

“It was part of the reason why we’re here in Atlanta,” NBA commissioner Adam Silver said, per CNN. Atlanta is home to a host of HBCUs including the acclaimed Atlanta University Center (AUC) which consists of legendary schools Morehouse College, Spellman College, and Clark Atlanta University. “This was an opportunity to focus on the HBCUs,” Silver added.

Master P wanted to extend this goal on his own. He explained in his IG caption that HBCUs graduate more women than any other league of higher education. This includes the Vice President of the United States, Kamala Harris, who graduated from Howard University in Washington, D.C.

Click here to read the full article on HBCU Connect

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